4 Types of Roof Shingles

Roofing materials are expensive so you should be sure to choose which type is best for you.  Knowing the characteristics of each one will help you make a much better choice. Here are some things to consider:

Image Source: Flickr

Organic
Organic asphalt shingles were originally made with wood chips, recycled cardboard, rags and paper. The shingles were considered:
Waterproof
Heavier than fiberglass shingles
Not as long-lasting as fiberglass
Inexpensive
Known as “felt mat asphalt shingles”
However, organic shingles are easily prone to moisture and saturation, which leads to more dangerous issues — especially in areas with high humidity or a lot of freezing temperatures. This leads the shingles to degrade and break far ahead of their 20-year life expectancy. Most homeowners have needed to replace their organic shingles with fiberglass alternatives because of this issue. Source: HomeAdvisor

Wood
More expensive than asphalt, wood shingles are known to be more aesthetically appealing because of their natural appearance. If you choose a hardwood, such as cedar or redwood, the shingles should last at least 30 years and sometimes as long as 50 years. Source: AngiesList

Solar
Solar shingles are one of the most modern types of roof shingles sold today. They’re very expensive compared to other roofing options but they aren’t there just to keep water out of your home. These shingles are also designed to generate electricity to power your home. Solar shingles are pleasing in appearance, but you won’t want to install them all over your roof so they will have to be installed alongside another type of roofing. Solar shingles only function optimally on the south side of a roof, and that’s where they should be installed if at all possible. Eastern and western exposures are possible too, but they won’t be as efficient. Source: Modernize

Slate
Slate is so durable it makes all other roofing materials look like rice paper.  Slate roofs from Shakespeare’s time are still holding tight.  Slate is real stone, laid down thick on the roof. But adequate truss strength is required to hold up this heavy load. Source: TheSpruce

We can help you pick the material that will best suit your budget as well as your needs. Contact us today!

 

Contact:
Kerrisdale Roofing & Drains
8279 Ross St, Vancouver, BC V5X 4W1
(604) 360-2114

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